Caribbean · Desserts & Puddings · Vegetarian

Mango Fool

This scrummy dessert is so easy to make I think it must have got its name cos you’d be a fool not to try it… lol

And this is how to do it…

Ingredients:

  • 350g ripe mango flesh
  • 300ml double cream
  • 0,5 tsp vanilla essence
  • 0,25tsp allspice
  • 3tbsp icing sugar
  • fresh sprigs of mint

Directions:

  1. Put mango chunks (but save just a little for garnish!) in a blender or liquidiser and blend.
  2. Whip together cream, allspice, vanilla essence and 2 tbsp icing sugar.
  3. Chill mango and cream separately for at least an hour.
  4. Just before serving fold the two together.
  5. Divide between four serving bowls or glasses.
  6. Sprinkle with remaing icing and garnish with mint and a few thin slices of mango
Ingredients

Allspice

Allspice, also called Jamaica Pepper or Pimento, is the dried unripe fruit of the Pimenta plant. Some people believe it’s a combination of spices, just like curry, but it is just one fruit. Its name was coined by the English because its flavour is like a combination of several aromatic spices, such as cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves.

The allspice fruit is picked when it is green and unripe and traditionally dried in the sun. When dry the fruits are brown and look like large brown peppercorns.

Allspice is normally sold as whole dried fruits or ground into powder. The whole fruits have a longer shelf-life than the powdered product and the taste is, of course, more aromatic when freshly ground before use.

Fresh allspice leaves are also used where available: they are similar to bay leaves in their texture and they are infused during cooking and then removed before serving. Unlike bay leaves,allspice leaves lose much flavour when dried and stored which is why they have to be used fresh. The leaves and wood are often used for smoking meats, and allspice can also be found in essential oil form.

In the Caribbean, allspice is one of the most important ingredients of the cuisine. It is used in jerk seasoning, in mole sauces, in pickling, curries and, sometimes, in bread.